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Waxing, facials, manicures, pedicures, nails (acrylic & gel), Minx, Smile White teeth whitening, eyelash & eyebrow treatments, botox, fillers, peels,  hopi ear candling, male grooming and more…. How to Remove Ingrown Hair:

 Exfoliate the area. Twice a day, scrub the ingrown hair gently. This will help to remove any dead skin cells, dirt, and oils that might be trapping the ingrown hair. It can also physically nudge the tip of the hair out of your skin. You need to exfoliate just enough to achieve this effect, but not so much that the ingrown hair starts to bleed. It's very difficult to remove an ingrown hair from under a scab. When in doubt, exfoliate more gently but for a longer period of time. Try to hit the ingrown hair from a variety of directions. Use an exfoliating glove, or try one of the following:


Apply a warm, moist compress to the area for a few minutes to soften the skin. Just wet a washcloth with hot water, wring it out, and press it against the ingrown hair.

When the washcloth cools down, run it under hot water again. If you can see the ingrown hair embedded in the skin, this treatment will soften the hair and bring it closer to the surface. If you can't initially see the hair, leave the warm compress on until it rises to the skin's surface. If you apply the compress for ten minutes and you still can't see any sign of hair, you're not going to be able to remove it yourself, or it might be something else altogether. And while you're fretting over your skin, this might be a good time to check for skin cancer.


Use a sterile needle or tweezers to gently tease the hair out of the skin. The warm compress should have brought the hair to the surface--don't dig for the hair if you can't easily get at it. Don't pluck the hair out completely if you can avoid doing so; just make sure that the ingrown end is out of the skin. It may take a little time to coax the hair out: be patient, and do not cut the skin.


Sometimes you'll see a loop of the hair close to the surface of the skin. This means that the tip of the hair has begun growing down into the skin. If you get a needle in the loop and tug lightly, the end will often come loose.


If you choose to use tweezers, remember that they can be bought either “pointy” or flat-tipped. A pointy-tipped pair may cause less damage to the skin around the hair if used carefully.


You can sterilise your tools by boiling in water or by cleaning with alcohol.


Wash the area around the (formerly) ingrown hair with warm water and a moisturising soap. Apply an antiseptic to provide extra protection against infection. Avoid wearing tight clothing on that area, and exfoliate regularly to prevent new ingrown hairs. If the inflammation extends beyond the immediate area of the hair follicle or persists for more than a few days after the hair has been freed, consider visiting a dermatologist or your doctor.


Removing ingrown hairs isn't exactly hard but does require prepping the skin and the right post-care for the best possible results. If the hair is infected or severely inflamed, physically removing the hair can irritate the skin further because it's in a fragile state, so please use caution.